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Best Places to Take Sunset Wedding Photos

Take Advantage of “The Golden Hour” 

If you’re wanting to capture that perfect sunset picture, you’ll want to check what time sunset is and make sure you’re on location and ready to shoot. Knowing the time of sunset will help with planning the time of the ceremony. It is important to schedule the ceremony so that it concludes with ample time before sunset. Consider how many family and wedding party photos you plan to take and give yourself enough time to get to your location in time to catch the magnificent colors. 

Choose The Best Sunset Locations

When choosing the best sunset shots, the camera will need to be pointed west. Preview the property and find areas where you'll be comfortable facing east. Silhouetted trees or other objects in the foreground give a sense of scale and location to the scene. Taking beautiful sunset photos can sometimes be challenging. Because of low light levels, shooting sunsets may require long exposure times, so be prepared to "hold it!" until the camera clicks. 

Discuss Sunset Effects With Your Photographer

To get those 'money shots', consider the use of special effects with your photographer. Some considerations include:
  1. Using off-camera flash for more portrait clarity. Since sunset portraits are always back-lit, a little fill flash will make all the difference between muddy and dark faces without the flash,.
  2. Using the camera's flash for increased portrait exposure and an overexposed background. This is on-trend for dramatic results. 
  3. Turning off the flash and shooting silhouettes. This will result in an abstract shape of your portrait in the foreground, and the sunset in the background.
  4. Using filters. A neutral density filter can be used to enhance colors. 
[ngg src="galleries" ids="5" display="basic_thumbnail"]All photos shot at Twin Oaks.

Posts Tagged ‘Wedding’

Best Places to Take Sunset Wedding Photos

Best Places to Take Sunset Wedding Photos

Take Advantage of “The Golden Hour” 

If you’re wanting to capture that perfect sunset picture, you’ll want to check what time sunset is and make sure you’re on location and ready to shoot. Knowing the time of sunset will help with planning the time of the ceremony. It is important to schedule the ceremony so that it concludes with ample time before sunset.

Consider how many family and wedding party photos you plan to take and give yourself enough time to get to your location in time to catch the magnificent colors. 

Choose The Best Sunset Locations

When choosing the best sunset shots, the camera will need to be pointed west. Preview the property and find areas where you’ll be comfortable facing east. Silhouetted trees or other objects in the foreground give a sense of scale and location to the scene.

Taking beautiful sunset photos can sometimes be challenging. Because of low light levels, shooting sunsets may require long exposure times, so be prepared to “hold it!” until the camera clicks. 

Discuss Sunset Effects With Your Photographer

To get those ‘money shots’, consider the use of special effects with your photographer. Some considerations include:

  1. Using off-camera flash for more portrait clarity. Since sunset portraits are always back-lit, a little fill flash will make all the difference between muddy and dark faces without the flash,.
  2. Using the camera’s flash for increased portrait exposure and an overexposed background. This is on-trend for dramatic results. 
  3. Turning off the flash and shooting silhouettes. This will result in an abstract shape of your portrait in the foreground, and the sunset in the background.
  4. Using filters. A neutral density filter can be used to enhance colors. 
All photos shot at Twin Oaks.

Dazzling Outdoor Lights

Summer weddings at Twin Oaks Golf Course, evening patio with market lightsLights – Part 2

Now that summer is in full swing, it’s time for outside weddings! With the right lights and ambiance you can turn any patio into your perfect dream wedding. Here are some of our favorite outdoor looks.

 

 

 

Summer weddings at Twin Oaks Golf Course, String lights

Market lights are back and in popular demand. Many venues like Twin Oaks Golf Course already have market lights set up, giving our patio a classic nostalgic touch to allow for an intimate evening. If your selected venue does not have market lights there are many local listings that will go to your venue and take care of the set-up and take-down. Use String lights as a great alternative to decorate walls, ivy, bushes and trees to give your wedding that extra little dazzle that makes for beautiful romantic pictures.

Summer weddings at Twin Oaks Golf Course, market lights with lanterns

 

Chandeliers and lanterns – no longer reserved for inside only. Chandeliers are being used outside to give the venue a personal touch from the bride and groom. Used them to change the entire style of wedding from modern to rustic or rustic to traditional. One of our favorites here, is to mix in some lanterns with our market lights. This adds a little more detail to our venue. Want to make it more personalized for your wedding? Order lanterns in your wedding colors or have a monogram placed on the lantern. Later you can take the lanterns home and use them on your own patio as a keepsake.

 

 

 

 

 

Lights, Camera, Action!

Weddings at Twin Oaks, uplighting

Beautiful Example of Uplighting

Join Us for a 7 Part Mini Blog on Wedding Idea’s and Advice!

Part 1…

Want to decorate those plain white walls at your wedding venue?

Try uplighting. Uplighting can be used to bring attention to the wedding party table, desserts, entrances and whatever else your heart desires! Add your wedding colors to the room and break up plain white walls. One of the best things about uplighting is they can change quickly to whatever color needs to be used and this can signal to your guests that it’s time to eat, toast or dance!

Gobo lighting is one of the latest trends to hit wedding walls. Gobo “Goes Before Optics” is a small stencil that slides over the light source to project any desired image on a wall, dance floor or ceiling. What’s great about this is it can be unique to you. Often times the happy couple will have a stencil of their monograms, dates or a starry night.

For more information, contact jjohnson@jcresorts.com or view our preferred vendor list.

 

Weddings at Twin Oaks Golf Course, Personalized gobo

Personalized Gobo. PC: Equinox Photo

Weddings at Twin Oaks Golf Course. Personalized gobo

Gobo on The Dance Floor

 

 

Charley & Amy

Military Couple

It was a regular work day…

Amy was working as a civil military contractor, her job consisted of visiting every military installation from Hawaii to the Midwest and everything in-between. Amy had met what felt like a million people on her travels, nobody had made her stop in her tracks quite like Charley did. Charley is a U.S. Marine stationed in Camp Pendleton. Amy literally walked into Charlie’s life and he became like the seagulls in Finding Nemo, “mine. mine. mine.” It was love at first sight for the both of them.

Now the couple can’t wait to get married and share their love with friends and family that will soon allow them to share a last name.

Ximena & Kyle

Weddings at Twin Oaks Golf Course

I met Ximena through work. Some friends planned a beach day. I tried teaching Ximena how to surf and we hit it off. The rest as you say is history. J

We got engaged on December 27th 2015. 

We both love the Lord, enjoy beach days, hiking, quality food, family, friends and traveling.

We choose Twin Oaks as our wedding venue because we felt it was such a beautiful place to get married. We were looking for a specific budget range and with the variety of Twin Oaks wedding package options it  completely exceeded our expectations.

Carol Anne & John

We got engaged December 12, 2015 (we went horseback riding on the beach — it was amazing!)

Kachele_Billings-web

We selected Twin Oaks as our venue for a few reasons — it’s where I grew up (right across the street from my house), and it had everything I was looking for in a venue (I love the grass area with the arch, the cute patios on the side, and the indoor clubhouse for the reception! I wanted to be able to have the ceremony and the reception at the same place.

We are both really looking forward to just being together more and doing life with each other after we get married. I currently live in San Marcos and John lives in Pacific Beach — it will be nice not to have to be so far apart!

Congratulations Berkleigh & Angel

As the wedding day approaches, Angel and I are getting more and more excited! We can’t wait to move forward with the food menu/location set up!

Berkleigh & Angel

We got engaged Nov 15, 2014. He asked me to marry him on the cliffs of La Jolla at sunset! Thank you and we look forward to planning the rest of our wedding with you soon!

Congratulations Allie & Roberto

We are so excited to be hosting your August Wedding at Twin Oaks Golf Course! We look forward to making your day very special.

About the Happy Couple:

Roberto and Allie met at BJs Restaurant, where they both worked. They quickly became friends and were dating seriously not long after that. After the birth of their daughter, Audrey, they were engaged and planning a wedding.

Why they selected Twin Oaks Golf Course:

“We selected Twin Oaks because we wanted an outdoor space to have both the reception and ceremony, Twin Oaks is close to our house and we loved the space and area as soon as we walked in.”

Choosing Your San Diego Wedding Reception Meal Style

The first big choice you’ll make as you plan your dinner is how to serve your guests. Back in the day, couples pretty much had two choices: a sit-down dinner or a buffet. But nowadays, there are so many more options to explore when deciding how to serve your reception meal. To help you figure out the best serving style for your celebration, we’ve outlined the five most popular meal options, along with some pros and cons for each.

San Diego Reception Meal Style: Plated Dinner
What it is: A plated, sit-down dinner is considered the most traditional and formal option as each guest is individually served a plated meal. Typically, guests are served three courses: appetizer, entrée, and dessert (sometimes a fourth course—an intermezzo or amuse bouche—is added before the entrée). Guests are usually given a choice of two (or three) entrées, which they select beforehand; another option is to serve each guest two proteins, such as meat and fish, on one plate (sometimes called a “duet” plate).

Why we love it: Everyone at the table gets their food at the same time. Also, by knowing the selections beforehand, food costs will be lower than a buffet or family-style meal. You can spread out activities (like dances and toasts) in between each course to keep guests engaged and maintain a nice energy throughout the meal service.

Things to consider: A sit-down meal requires more servers, both due to the plating in the kitchen and to serve the meal to guests. So the staffing portion of your catering bill will be higher. Also, the food options are limited to what you picked during your tasting, so if you have a lot of picky eaters in attendance, there’s a chance they may not eat everything on their plate.

San Diego Reception Meal Style: Buffet
What it is: Food stations are set up on long tables where guests can walk along and serve themselves. Another option is to have servers stationed behind the buffet table serving each dish. A buffet-style reception is usually considered the most casual style of meal service.

Why we love it: Fewer servers are needed with a buffet reception, which means you may save some money on your catering-staff charges (though you still need staffers to tend to the buffet, and waiters to provide water and wine to the tables). Buffets make it easier and more cost effective to provide guests with a variety of choices, which is helpful since many people have so many types of allergies and dietary restrictions. This service style also promotes mingling and interacting among guests.

Things to consider: Guests have to serve themselves and carry their own plates, which may not be as elegant as you would like. Buffets also require larger quantities of food since people tend to eat more when they serve themselves, which will add to your food costs.

San Diego Reception Meal Style: Food Stations
What it is: A station-style reception is one where the food is spread out among different “stations” throughout the reception space. For example, there may be one area that is a carving station, a raw bar, a tapas station, a dessert station, and so forth. The portions served at each station are typically on the smaller side, usually requiring just two or three bites to finish.

Why we love it: Creative food stations and presentations are crowd-pleasers; guests will also appreciate the wide variety of dishes and the interactive element. Since the stations are spread out throughout the space, guests won’t likely have to wait in line (for very long, at least). At cook-to-order stations, guests can request exactly how they would like their dish prepared. This meal style also promotes a lot of interaction among guests.

Things to consider: Your reception site will need ample room to accommodate the extra space food stations require. You will also need more chefs if you have interactive stations (i.e. pasta, carving stations, etc.), adding to your food bill.

San Diego Reception Meal Style: Family-Style *TREND ALERT*
What it is: Popular in 2014 and continuing into 2015, Family Style is similar to a sit-down dinner, with guests assigned to specific dinner tables and waiters to bring the food to the table. However, large portions of the dinner offerings are placed on each table on serving platters for guests to fill their own plates (it’s just like sitting down for dinner at home with your family!). This popular San Diego Wedding trend reminds us of home-style family dinners we all grew up with.

Why we love it: Guests can help themselves to as much food as they’d like. The mealtime will be very efficient since guests can begin eating immediately after serving themselves. This service style also promotes interacting and conversations among guests.

Things to consider: Family-style dining requires ample space on your dinner tables for the various platters and dishes. You may need to increase your budget for rental items to account for additional platters and serving pieces.

San Diego Reception Meal Style: Cocktail-Style Reception *TREND ALERT*
What it is: Another more recent trend, a cocktail-style reception features hors d’oeuvres and other small bites offered all evening long in lieu of a sit-down meal. The hors d’oeuvres are usually one- or two-bite portions and can be a combination of hot and cold options. The hors d’oeuvres can be passed by servers or stationary for guests to get themselves. This reception style is a good choice for couples wanting a more casual atmosphere and for their guests to really mingle and meet each other.

Why we love it: If your venue is small, cocktail receptions allow you to have more people since you won’t need dinner tables and chairs for every guest. They’re also typically shorter than a sit-down meal, and they allow you and your groom to easily circulate throughout the room and chat with everyone. Also, since you’re not serving a main entrée, your food costs could potentially be more affordable.

Things to consider: Some guests may not have attended a cocktail wedding reception, so there may be some confusion if they are expecting a full meal (which is why it’s important to word your invitation clearly, like this: “Please join us for a cocktail reception after the ceremony”). However, while your food costs might be lower, your guests will likely drink more than at a dinner reception, so your liquor costs might go up. Since most people won’t be seated, some guests will have trouble seeing events like the first dance.

Weddings from Around the World

Love is universal, but how we celebrate love and union differs from place to place, person to person.

1410_graphic-jc golf-world weddings-compressed

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America

American wedding customs borrow heavily from other cultures, allowing for great flexibility.
While veils have become an element of the bride’s fashion…

  • The Romans implemented flame-colored veils to ward off evil spirits.
  • In many religions, the veil symbolizes respect and humility before God.
  • In Victorian times, the length, weight, and quality of the veil signified the bride’s social status.

The “something old, something new…” tradition comes from an Old English rhyme with each object meant as a good luck charm.

  • Something old: Continuity
  • Something new: Optimism for the future
  • Something borrowed: Borrowed happiness
  • Something blue: Purity, love, fidelity
  • A sixpence in your shoe: Good fortune and prosperity

Spain/Mexico

After the bride accepts the proposal, the groom is expected to give the bride’s father a watch.

Madrinas and padrinos, which are special wedding sponsors, act as mentors throughout the couple’s engagement and marriage.

The groom gives the bride 13 gold coins (las arras), which symbolize good luck and the groom’s ability to financially provide for the bride.

After the exchange of vows, the lazo, a long strand of rosary beads, is placed around the couple’s necks in the shape of a figure eight, symbolizing union and protection.

Jamaica

The traditional wedding cake is a fruit cake laced with strong rum.

  • As soon as the couple is engaged, the groom’s grandmother is responsible for soaking dried fruit in rum during the engagement period.
  • The mother or grandmother of the bride bakes the cake using the rum-soaked fruit a week before the wedding.
  • On the morning of the wedding, the cake is carried to the venue in a procession led by the village matriarchs.

The bride’s gown incorporates a piece of lace from her mother’s gown.

Under the groom’s supervision, men of the community construct a marquee for the venue using coconut boughs.

Pakistan

Pakistani weddings occur in stages over a few days.

  • Mehndi – The two families come together to celebrate the upcoming wedding. Guests wear green, orange, yellow, and other bright colors. The bride’s hands are painted with henna.
  • Baraat – Considered the main wedding event, the event is hosted by the bride’s family and includes a feast and a holy ceremony (Nikah) wherein the bride and groom are declared husband and wife.
  • Walima – This event is hosted by the groom and his family and involves a big feast and general merriment.

India

During the pre-wedding ceremony, called mandap muhurat, the bride and groom are rubbed with turmeric powder for smooth skin.

Female friends apply henna paintings to the bride’s hands.

Saptapadi, the exchange of vows, is the most important part of the ceremony.

  • The bride and groom circle a sacred fire three times.
  • The couple exchanges vows after the first round, which takes exactly seven steps.
  • After the third round, the groom gives the bride a silver ring.

In lieu of cake, newlyweds feed each other five bites of (usually) honey and yogurt.

China

The morning of the wedding, the groom must perform various tasks for the bride’s family in an elaborate ceremony before the bride is “let go.”

A pre-wedding tea ceremony acts as a “formal introduction” between the bride and the groom’s family.

Superstitions dictate that the exchange of vows happens at a half hour mark, ensuring that the marriage starts on a literal upswing with the hands of the clock moving up to the top.

Japan

The bride is painted white to signify that she is a pure maiden.

The bride also wears an elaborate hood to hide her “horns of jealousy,” symbolizing her urge to become an obedient, gentle wife.

San-san-kudo – The groom and the bride take three separate sips of rice wine from different cups. The sake is then offered to their families to symbolize new bonds.

South Korea

South Korean weddings often start with a more modern Western ceremony before proceeding to a smaller traditional ceremony.

Traditionally, a man wishing to marry a woman would provide her parents with a pair of live geese. Today, the geese have been replaced by a pair of wooden ducks, symbolizing the bride and groom.

The bride and groom seal their union by drinking a special rice wine poured into a half-gourd.

At the end of the traditional paebaek ceremony, the parents throw dried dates at the couple. The couple holds an embroidered sheet between them. The number of dates they catch indicates the number of children they will have.

Germany

When a German girl is born, the family plants several trees in her honor. Come wedding day, the trees are sold, and the money is used for her dowry.

Friends and family also print a wedding newspaper, featuring pictures and articles about the couple. The paper is sold at the wedding, and the money goes toward the honeymoon.

Ethiopia

On the wedding day, the bride’s family and friends block entrance into her home. The groom and his “best men” must sing and force their way into the bride’s home.

Ghana

The groom and his family proposes to the bride in the presence of friends, family, and well-wishers.

Kenya

The Swahili people bathe their brides in sandalwood oils and draw henna designs on her limbs.

Madagascar

Some sources suggest that Malagasy grooms practice the traditions of vodiondry and tampi-maso.

  • Literally translating to “lamb’s rump,” vodiondry is a gift given by the groom to the bride’s parents as a sign of respect and gratitude.
  • Meaning “eyewear,” the tampi-maso is a gift given to the bride’s brother, traditionally meant as a decoy to distract him from the sorrow of losing his sister.

Italy

Friends and family tie a knot in front of the wedding chapel as a sign of the newlyweds union.

At the end of the wedding reception, Italians will often break glass. The number of glass shards determines the number of happy years of marriage.

Ireland

During Leap Years, women are traditionally expected to propose to men.

Irish brides used to carry real horseshoes for luck. Now they have porcelain or fabric horseshoes.

Czech Republic

Prior to the wedding, the bride’s friends plant a tree in her yard. The tree is decorated with painted eggshells and colorful ribbons. According to legend, the bride will live as long as the tree.

Norway

The wedding cake, known as the kransekake, is made of bread and is topped with cream, cheese, and syrup.

The bride wears a silver or gold crown featuring spoon-shaped bangles that, according to legend, ward off evil spirits with their tinkling.

Wales

Welsh grooms carve lovespoons for their potential brides. Traditionally, the spoon showed the bride’s father that the groom could provide for his family and is capable of fine woodworking.

Russia

Vykup nevesty – On the day of the wedding, the groom must pay a ransom—normally jewelry or money—to the bride’s parents. Once the parents are satisfied, they give the bride away to the groom.

Sweden

Swedish brides traditionally wear three rings:

  • One for engagement
  • One for marriage
  • One for motherhood

During the reception, if the groom leaves the room, the other men are allowed to kiss the bride, and vice versa.

Brought to you by Weddings at Twin Oaks | weddingsattwinoaks.com

Resources:
• http://www.businessinsider.com/how-weddings-are-celebrated-around-the-world-2011-10?op=1
• http://people.howstuffworks.com/culture-traditions/cultural-traditions/10-wedding-traditions-with-surprising-origins.htm
• http://www.cooldailyinfographics.com/post/weddings-around-the-world
• http://wedding.theknot.com/wedding-planning/wedding-customs/qa/wedding-traditions-the-meaning-of-something-old.aspx
• http://www.ivillage.ca/relationships/marriage/wedding-traditions-around-the-world
• http://www.worldlyweddings.com/hispanic-traditions-a/122.htm
• http://weddingdetails.com/lore-tradition/jamaica/
• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_customs_by_country
• http://chinese.weddings.com/articles/top-chinese-wedding-faq.aspx
• http://wedding.theknot.com/wedding-planning/wedding-customs/articles/korean-wedding-traditions.aspx
• http://www.africanmarriage.info/
• http://africasafariblog.com/?p=3035
• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lovespoon
• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_wedding_traditions
• http://www.yourlivingcity.com/stockholm/community/swedish-wedding-traditions-customs-culture/